At China’s annual meeting of its top legislative body, three draft reports are usually submitted for delegates to discuss and approve.

They comprise the premier’s government work report, the National Development and Reform Commission’s economic development report, and the Ministry of Finance’s budget report.

The documents provide a review of the past year and explain how the central authorities will govern the country in the coming year.

This year’s plenary session will also review and approve the proposed 13th five-year plan for the period from 2016 through to 2020. 

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Here are the five key points to take away from the draft plan and reports.

1. Growth target set at 6.5 to 7 per cent

This year’s proposed target for gross domestic product expansion has been set at a range between 6.5 per cent to 7 per cent.

The range, rather than a specific number, reflects China’s dilemma between pursuing economic growth and pushing ahead with reforms.

Innovation would be the top driving force for future growth, according to Li’s work report.

2. Hong Kong, Macau to play bigger roles in China’s economic development; Taiwan policies to be maintained

Beijing will “elevate Hong Kong and Macau’s positions and roles in China’s economic development and opening up” according to their “distinctive strengths”, Li said.

In its draft 13th five-year plan, also released on Saturday, China pledged to support Hong Kong in furthering its status as a global financial, shipping and trading hub.

He added that Beijing would adhere to previous policies on Taiwan, “firmly oppose secessionist activities” and maintain peaceful development of cross-strait ties.

3. Further interest rate liberalisation; government-managed floating system to stay

China has pledged to further liberalise interest rates and stick to a government-managed floating system.

Beijing aimed this year to keep the yuan generally stable on a “reasonable and balanced level” and to control “abnormal flow of cross-border capital effectively”, according to the annual report of China’s top economic planner, the National Development and Reform Commission.

4. China to boost overseas defence

The premier also pledged to improve China’s ability to protect its citizens and businesses abroad.

China would ensure that the G20 summit in Hangzhou this September would go smoothly, Li said. Beijing would “participate constructively” in seeking solutions for global issues, he added.

The government has budgeted 954 billion yuan (HK$1.13 trillion) for defence spending this year – a 7.6 per cent increase from last year. 

5. Slack officials warned, blundering ones to get second chance, rewards for innovators

Li warned officials against neglecting their duties.

China has been facing a situation in which many cadres chose not to perform their duties at all for fear of making mistakes and getting hauled up amid the country’s ongoing corruption crackdown.

Li warned that the Communist Party would have zero tolerance for officials who slacked off on their jobs. There was room for correction for those who made mistakes and rewards for innovators, he said.

See the full article from the South China Morning Post here.

 

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